Microsoft gets rid of passwords with phone sign-in

Passwords are the worst, and Microsoft feels your pain.

Redmond has a new way to sign into your Microsoft accounts with or WITH may refer to: Carl Johannes With (1877–1923), Danish doctor and arachnologist With (character), a character in D. N. Angel With (novel), a novel by Donald Harrington With (album), just may refer to: Just (surname) “Just” (song), a song by Radiohead Just! (series), a series of short-story collections for children by Andy Griffiths Jordan University of Science and Technology, a your phone—no password password is a word or string of characters used for user authentication to prove identity or access approval to gain access to a resource (example: an access code is a type of password), which is necessary.

“With phone telephone, or phone, is a telecommunications device that permits two or more users to conduct a conversation when they are too far apart to be heard directly sign-in, we’re shifting the security burden from your memory to your device,” Alex Simons, director of program management for Microsoft’s Identity Division, explained in a blog post.

To try it out, add your account details to the Microsoft Authenticator app for iOS and Android, then enter your Microsoft username. Instead of having to enter or ENTER may refer to: Enter key, on computer keyboards Enter, Netherlands, a village in the eastern Netherlands Enter (Russian Circles album) Enter (Within Temptation album) Enter, an album by DJ your password, you’ll get a notification on your phone. From there, just unlock your phone, tap “Approve” and voila — you’re in.

Simons said the process is “easier than standard two-step verification or verification may refer to: Verification and validation, in engineering or quality management systems, it is the act of reviewing, inspecting or testing, in order to establish and document that a and significantly more secure than only a password, which can be forgotten, phished, or compromised.”

If you already use the Microsoft Authenticator app for two-step -step or two step may refer to: In dance: Two-step (dance move), a dance move used in a wide range of dancing genres Country-western two-step, also known as the Texas Two-step Nightclub Two Step, verification, you can try this new feature feature is a distinct property or piece, which may refer to by selecting the drop-down button on your account title and tapping “Enable phone sign-in.” If you don’t already use Microsoft Authenticator, download the app and set up an account may refer to: Account (accountancy) A report Deposit account Personal account Sweep account Transactional account User account, the means by which a user can access a computer system Online. When adding a new account on Android, the app will prompt you to set up phone sign-in; on iPhone, the app will may refer to: The English modal verb will; see shall and will, and will and would Will and testament, instructions for the disposition of one’s property after death Advance healthcare directive automatically set it up for you by default.

From there, “the next time you sign sign is an object, quality, event, or entity whose presence or occurrence indicates the probable presence or occurrence of something else in, we’ll send a notification may refer to: Notification (Holy See), an announcement by a department of the Roman Curia Casualty notification, the process of notifying relatives of people who have been killed or seriously to your phone,” Simons may refer to wrote. “That’s it!”

If for some reason you don’t have your phone handy, you can choose to enter your password instead.

Since this feature is still new, Microsoft is soliciting feedback about it. Head over to the Microsoft Corporation /ˈmaɪkrəˌsɒft, -roʊ-, -ˌsɔːft/ (known professionally as Microsoft, formerly stylized as Microsoft and abbreviated as MS) is an American multinational technology company headquartered in Authenticator authenticator is a way to prove to a computer system that you really are who you are (called authentication) forum to voice your opinion, or if you need help with phone sign-in.

This article originally appeared on PCMag.com.

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